Space 4235

Genis Novas Deus

Kristian Skylstad, Genis Novas Deus
297 × 420mm (A3), pigment ink on Hahnemühle cotton paper, prints limited to 100 pieces.

Contact contact@space4235.com for more info.

untitled

Simona Barbera, untitled (grain #1)
297 × 420mm (A3), pigment ink on Hahnemühle cotton paper, unlimited edition prints. More info about piece.

Contact contact@space4235.com for more info.

Line liners shift

Ronny Faber Dahl, Line liners shift / (shade3)
329 x 483mm (A3+), pigment ink on Hahnemühle cotton paper, prints limited to 100 pieces.

Contact contact@space4235.com for more info.

Line liners shift

Ronny Faber Dahl, Line liners shift / (shade2)
329 x 483mm (A3+), pigment ink on Hahnemühle cotton paper, prints limited to 100 pieces.

35€ + 15€ int. shipping/packaging

Contact contact@space4235.com for more info.

Line liners shift

Ronny Faber Dahl, Line liners shift / (shade1)
329 x 483mm (A3+), pigment ink on Hahnemühle cotton paper, prints limited to 100 pieces.

Contact contact@space4235.com for more info.

ISG Chain

925 silver + 56cm chain. Pendant height 2cm.

 

Contact info@isgisgisgisgisgisgisgisgisg.com for more info.

Unsolicited Goods

Ronny Faber Dahl, Unsolicited Goods
collana la c., vol. 15, dicembre 2018
14×20 cm, 50 pagg.
100 copie

combines a series of two-dimensional, three-dimensional and photographic
works made between 2017 and 2018. A text by Kristian Skylstad is included

Published by la centrale edizioni

10€ + 10€ int. shipping/packaging

Contact contact@space4235.com for more info.

Parallels

14th of September 17:00 – 15th of October

Networked societies change structure before we do. Or is it the opposite? Do we really understand what has evolved? Meanwhile we go sideways, look another way, liquify. One is here but at the same time not. Is there some feeling that is impossible to say or write? Just the right combination can materialize a feeling of what is not said. Beyond shape and presence, there is something tactile and realized crooked. Fragile.

While strongly autonomous directions, these artists are working with digital and sculptural media as an insecure form, always expanding critically on shapes beyond what can be said as a peripheral poetry, digital to material, captured void, casting, and surrounding shapes.

Simona Barbera
Matteo Cremonesi
Ronny Faber Dahl
Carlo Miele
Mattia Pajè
Henrik Pask
Serena Porrati

Curated in collaboration with Carlotta Pezzolo and Fumogeni
Poster: Painting by Mattia Pajè

 

 

Matteo Cremonesi, Sculpture / Washer, 2018

 

Mattia Pajè, Fine, 2018

 

Carlo Miele, Swipe With Hands, 2018

 

 

Simona Barbera, Multiple Distances, 2018

 

 

Henrik Pask, AALL ttl, 2018

 

 

Mattia Pajè, Expand (Night), 2018

 

Ronny Faber Dahl, Diversions Series, 2018

 

 

Serena Porrati, Damascus, 2018

Fumogeni #2 Marco Armiero

Wednesday, 28th of February 2018

 

Marco Armiero is Director of the Environmental Humanities Laboratory at the KTH Royal Institute of Technology in Stockholm, Sweden, where he is also Associate Professor of Environmental History. He is the author of A Rugged Nation. Mountains and the Making of Modern Italy (2011, translated into Italian in 2013) and co-editor of several volumes: A History of Environmentalism. Local Struggles, Global Histories (2014); An Environmental history of mass migration (2017); Future Remains. A cabinet of curiosities for the Anthropocene (2017); and Nature and History in Modern Italy (2010). He has published articles and edited special issues in Environment and History, Left History, Radical History Review, Modern Italy, Southern Atlantic Quarterly, Capitalism Nature Socialism, and the Journal of Political Ecology. He is a senior editor of Capitalism Nature Socialism and an associate editor of Environmental Humanities.

 

“Scientists have identified a new epoch, the Anthropocene (the Age of Humans), marked by a technostratigraphy of wasted matter, such as carbon sediments, radionuclides and microplastics, accumulating within the earth surface (Crutzen 2006). Waste can be considered the essence of the Anthropocene, embodying humans’ ability to affect the environment to the point of transforming it into a gigantic dump. For this reason I have argued that this new epoch might be called the Wasteocene (Armiero and De Angelis 2017). However, the Wasteocene frames waste not as an object – ‘waste’ – but as a relation – ‘wasting’. My hypothesis is that while wasting relationships are based on consuming and ‘othering’, that is, on sorting out what and who is waste -, commoning practices are based on reproducing resources and communities. Is it true that we live in the Wasteocene? And if yes, is there a way to escape from it? Or perhaps should we embrace it? Can we sabotage the Wasteocene? Where are the toxic stories of this age?
Marco Armiero, 2018

 
 

 
photo by ‎Eleonora Chiesa‎
 

Fumogeni #1 Elizabeth A. Povinelli

Saturday, 9th of December 2017

Elizabeth Povinelli’s writing has focused on developing a critical theory of late liberalism that would support an anthropology of the otherwise. Informed primarily by the traditions of American pragmatism and continental immanent theory and grounded in the circulation of values, materialities, and socialities. This potential theory has unfolded primarily from within a sustained relationship with Indigenous colleagues in north Australia and across five books, numerous essays, and four films with the Karrabing Film Collective. Geontologies: A Requiem to Late Liberalism was the 2017 recipient of the Lionel Trilling Book Award. Karrabing films were awarded the 2015 Visible Award and the 2015 Cinema Nova Award Best Short Fiction Film, Melbourne International Film Festival and have shown internationally including in the Berlinale Forum Expanded, Sydney Biennale; MIFF, the Tate Modern, documenta-14, and the Contour Biennale.